Staying on Track

Sophomore+Kallie+Kolthoff%2C+studying+for+AP+Psychology.
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Staying on Track

Sophomore Kallie Kolthoff, studying for AP Psychology.

Sophomore Kallie Kolthoff, studying for AP Psychology.

Olivia Riley-Schmelzer

Sophomore Kallie Kolthoff, studying for AP Psychology.

Olivia Riley-Schmelzer

Olivia Riley-Schmelzer

Sophomore Kallie Kolthoff, studying for AP Psychology.

Olivia Riley-Schmelzer, Writer

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Kennedy has racked up a total of nine snow days so far this school year, which has forced teachers to adjust their schedules accordingly.  Those missed days have caused stress among AP students and teachers, considering they have a limited schedule to fit in all the information needed to be successful on the exams.

AP students take their AP exams in early May and have very little wiggle room when it comes to what content needs to be covered.

Dana Melone, an AP teacher here at Kennedy High School, shares some of the struggles of readjusting the course plan.

“It’s always tricky when you’re put off a day to try to figure out how you’re going to change it and I think the schedule is planned out the way that it is because I want to get all the chapters in in a certain time to make sure we have review time for the AP test,” Melone said. “So if you just keep pushing dates back, you’re not going to have that review time for the AP exam, and so instead of pushing dates back, you have to figure out what you’re going to take out and often times that’s the stuff that the students find most enjoyable.”

A lot of stress came from the worry of making up work, but it seems that students had a more difficult time getting back into the routine of coming to school every day.

Even as the weather gets nicer, if you feel like you are falling behind, get the help you need. Go to tutorials to get further explanations, form study groups and see how other students have processed the material. Those nine days forced a lot of students to learn important content in a shorter amount of time, but even with the obstacles the cut days have produced, Melone doesn’t seem to be concerned about her student’s ability to succeed.

“I’m not worried yet,” Melone said, “I think if this pattern continues and we are out a lot more, then it might start to be an issue, but I leave enough time at the end of the year that it just cuts down on in class review, so I’m not super worried yet.”

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